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Intellect

BYU economics professors to discuss current crisis in Oct. 15 lecture

In response to requests to address the current economic crisis, the Brigham Young University Economics Department will host a lecture, “Economic Perspectives on the Current Crisis,” Wednesday, Oct. 15, at 3 p.m. in 151 N. Eldon Tanner Building.

The lecture will include a panel of economics professors and a question-and-answer session. The campus community is invited to attend.

“This is the front page news in every newspaper — the financial crisis has even surpassed the war in the media,” said Richard Evans, associate professor of economics. “As a service to the university, we will discuss what is going on and how to respond.”

The speakers will include Evans as well as James Kearl and David Spencer, professors of economics. Each person on the panel will provide a summary and a specific angle on what is happening with the economic crisis.

“Should the government be bailing out businesses? Why is the government taking ownership of banks? What would happen if we let the banks fail? Is there a possibility that we could go into a depression?” Evans asked. “These are the questions being thrown around by the media, and through this panel we hope to provide answers.”

For more information, contact Mary Hokanson at (801) 422-3802.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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