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Intellect

BYU computer science student presents at international symposium

Brigham Young University student Tim van der Horst has been invited to present his latest research in the field of computer security at an international conference this week in Nice, France.

A doctorate student in computer science, van der Horst will present at SecureComm 2007, the Third International Conference on Security and Privacy in Communication Networks.

Only one-fourth of the research advancements submitted this year for potential inclusion in the conference were actually selected to be presented.

Van der Horst will present a simple yet novel method for Web authentication he has developed that addresses the problem of users having too many passwords.

The idea behind his design is to completely replace the need for passwords at secure Web sites by using an automated process that involves users’ e-mail or instant messaging accounts and randomly generated digital security keys. This new system is more convenient and secure than current techniques used by Web sites, he said.

For more information, contact Kent Seamons at (801) 422-3722.

Writer: Aaron Searle

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