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Intellect

BYU College of Physical, Mathematical Sciences plans Spring Conference March 15

Brigham Young University’sCollege of Physical and Mathematical Sciences will host its Spring Conferencebeginning at 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 15, in the Jesse Knight Building.

The event will feature a drawing for a free iPod as well as a continental breakfast. High school mathematics and science instructors and their students are especially welcome to attend.

Several BYU undergraduateand graduate students will present their original research in a variety of fields. Afew of the titles include:

·“New Star TrekTricorder for Combating Terrorism” by Jackie Murray, chemistry

·“Teaching ComputersHow to Do Genealogy” by Steve Ivie, computer science

·“ComputationalChainsaws: Pruning DNA Alignment Trees for Efficient Genetic Analysis” byKendell Clement, computer science

·“Exploring the DuneFields of Saturn's Moon Titan” by Chris Spencer, geological sciences

·“Can Math Really MakeYou a Millionaire?” By Basil Williams, mathematics

·“Quit Polling MyMarkov Chain” by Jeremy West, Mathematics

·“The Mathematics ofBubbles” by Drew Johnson, mathematics education

·“Making Tiny NintendoWii-like Accelerometers from the Strongest Thing in the Universe” by DavidHutchison, physics and astronomy

·“Recycling Stars in aNearby Galaxy” by Tabitha Bush, physics and astronomy

·“Game Point! EvaluatingVolleyball Skills” by Lindsay Florence, statistics

In addition to the generalsession, more than 300 student research presentations will be available.

A DVD showing some of theresearch to be presented at the conference is available at http://cpms.byu.edu/springresearch/info. For more information on the conference, visitcpms.byu.edu.

Writer: David Luker

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