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Intellect

BYU Chemicals Management lists guidelines for disposing of e-waste

Electronic waste (or e-waste) refers to discarded computers, monitors, printers, cell phones, copy machines, fax machines, and similar items. Over the last few years, the EPA has increased their emphasis on the proper disposal of these types of waste. In some cases, fines have been assessed to institutions that have not properly disposed of e-waste.

In order to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations, BYU Chemicals Management disposes of all e-waste. Most of this equipment comes to us indirectly through BYU Surplus. Departments sending their e-waste to Surplus should continue to do so. It will be properly managed and disposed of as necessary.

Departments disposing of any of these types of waste on their own, however, need to be aware of the applicable regulations and need to be able to prove that the wastes have been disposed of properly. E-waste may not go into the landfill.

Chemicals Management will dispose of e-wastes originating from BYU at no charge to the departments (no personal or household wastes, please). Any BYU entity may contact us to arrange for a pick-up. Also, if there are any questions or concerns we are happy to address them.

As a reminder, Chemicals Management also disposes of all batteries, aerosol cans (including empty cans), fluorescent light tubes and all other regulated wastes.

For more information, contact Billy Meaders, Regulated Waste Management Officer, 404-0914.

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