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Intellect

BYU Benefits Services lists tuition benefit guidelines

BYU Benefits Services has issued the following guidelines for faculty and staff members who are interested in using the tuition benefit for their spouses, their dependents and themselves:

BYU-Idaho Dependent Tuition Benefit—

Please contact Benefits Services at BYU-Provo (D-240 ASB, ext. 2-4496) if you have dependents planning to attend BYU-Idaho this fall who are eligible to receive the dependent tuition benefit. If Benefits Services is notified of dependents planning to attend BYU-Idaho, payment of the one-half tuition benefit can be authorized and eligible dependents will only need to pay one-half tuition to BYU-Idaho at the start of the semester.

Spouse Tuition Benefit—

The BYU Employee Tuition Benefit pays a full tuition benefit for eligible spouses. However, for spouses enrolled in a graduate degree-seeking program, that benefit is taxable. Because of this, before the tuition benefit can be paid, the employee is required to complete a Tuition Taxation Form for Spouses Taking Graduate Classes and turn it in to Benefits Services in D-240 ASB. The form can be obtained from Benefits Services or from the Web site at https://byu.edu/hr/benefits/forms. The form outlines the taxation payment options available under the Internal Revenue Code. Any questions can be directed to Benefits Services at ext. 2-4716.

Approval for Daytime Class Attendance—

Regular faculty, staff and administrative personnel wishing to take classes during the hours of 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. for credit, audit or thesis hours need to have written approval from their department chair or supervisor and the dean or director over their area. Personnel Request for Class Attendance forms may be obtained from the Benefits Services, D-240 ASB, or online at https://byu.edu/hr/benefits/forms. The form must be returned to Benefits Services before the daytime tuition benefit can be paid.

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