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Breaking news more interesting than scriptures? Think again, says Bruce Money

Tuesday's Devotional speaker Bruce Money said scripture study is one "stamp" in our spiritual passport.

Try to cross an international border without your passport and you'll be stuck. Tuesday's Devotional speaker Bruce Money said just as we need a passport to move from one temporal country to the next, the Lord's country and kingdom requires its own special "passport" with validating "stamps."

Money, who is the director of the Global Management Center at the Marriott School, suggested one way we can stamp our spiritual passport is by putting our scripture study first—before our favorite novels, and the day's gripping headlines.

"Don’t be guilty, as most of us have been at times, of saying: 'What’s in the headlines today is just more interesting and important than what somebody wrote hundreds or thousands of years ago.' It is not. Scriptures are somebody’s spiritual journals, and those somebodies are prophets of the living God." 

Find more ways to "stamp your passport" by listening to Money's address which can be streamed on demand at BYUtv.org and will be available on speeches.byu.edu

Next Devotional Address
Next week’s devotional (Tuesday, July 29, at 11:05 a.m., in the de Jong Concert Hall) will be given by Sheri Palmer, associate professor in the College of Nursing. 

Palmer's talk is titled titled “Convenient Service” – an oxymoron perhaps, but something we can learn to do. Her remarks will focus on Revelations 2:19, which says “I know thy works, and charity, and service, and faith, and thy patience, and thy works; and the last to be more than the first.”

Writer: Paige Montgomery Vogt

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Photo by BYU Photo

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