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Intellect

"Books for Young Readers Symposium" at BYU July 18-19

The Brigham Young University "Books for Young Readers Symposium" for librarians, teachers and parents, featuring nationally acclaimed authors and illustrators, will be Friday and Saturday, July 18 and 19, in the Provo City Library at Academy Square.

On Friday, the symposium will include presentations by children's book authors Susan Fletcher, award-winning author of "Walk Across the Sea"; David Small, 2001 Caldecott winner for "So You Want to Be President"; Sarah Stewart who has collaborated with her husband, Small, on several Caldecott honor books; and Franny Billingsley, author of two fantasy novels, "Well Wished" and "The Folk Keeper."

Russell Freedman, winner of the 1988 Newbery Medal for "Lincoln: A Biography," will be the featured speaker at the Virginia Sorenson Lecture and Dinner Friday evening.

The symposium will conclude on Saturday with presentations by children's book illustrator Bethanne Andersen and Newbery Honor Book author Laurence Yep, whose books teach children about what it's like to be an outsider.

For more information on the Books for Young Readers Symposium, please contact BYU Conferences and Workshops at (801) 378-2568 or visit them on the Web at http://ce.byu.edu/cw/childlit/.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

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