Skip to main content
Intellect

"Being Enough" topic of November lecture series at BYU

Women's Services and Resources at Brigham Young University will continue its fall lecture series on the BYU campus with a set of lectures titled "Being Enough."

The lectures for November, designed to improve the self-image of participants, will be held Thursdays at 11 a.m. in 3223 Wilkinson Student Center. The lecturers are:

  • Nov. 6, "My Best is Good Enough." Matt Richardson, an associate professor of Church history and doctrine, will focus on being happy with one's best self.

  • Nov. 13, "Enjoying the Journey." Gary Palmer, associate professor of recreation management and youth leadership, will discuss the use of laughter to lead a happier life.

  • Nov. 20, "I'm a Mango, Not a Pineapple." Lili Anderson from the School of Family Life at BYU, will discuss the benefits of not comparing. The Women's Services and Resources Center seeks to empower women and men to appreciate their identity, destiny and responsibility through advisement, information, crisis intervention, support, counseling, referral and networking with other services on campus.

    For more information, contact Women's Services and Resources at (801) 422-4877 or at 1520 Wilkinson Student Center.

    Writer: Thomas Grover

    Related Articles
    data-content-type="article"
    June 30, 2020
    In addition to being one of the top programs in the country, BYU’s advertising department fosters an environment to talk about important issues.
    overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
    data-content-type="article"
    June 29, 2020
    According to recent BYU research, members of virtual teams identify leaders in significantly different ways compared to members of in-person teams.
    overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
    data-content-type="article"
    June 26, 2020
    A new study shows a strong correlation between how much women with autistic traits camouflage—hide or compensate for autistic qualities to fit in—and the severity of their mental health concerns.
    overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
    overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=