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Intellect

Bean Life Science Museum to Temporarily Close West Center Atrium Exhibit Area

Museum to remain open during remodeling

The Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum at Brigham Young University will temporary close of the West Center Atrium Exhibit Area for remodeling. The atrium closure is scheduled to begin on Tuesday, August 4.

The rest of the museum, including Life on Top: Apex Predators, the Fred and Sue Morris Bird Gallery and the Boyd K. Packer Gallery will remain open. 

The area affected by the closure is home to the African Elephant, Protect Your Planet, Into Africa, Insects, Life Submerged and Children's Room exhibits.  Remodeling will involve replacement of the ceiling, lighting, mechanical and the floor coverings in this area.

Construction will take approximately three months and is scheduled to re-open in early December. 

About the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum
Located on the campus of Brigham Young University at 645 East 1430 North in Provo, UT, the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum has a collection of 2.8 million specimens, the oldest dating back to 1900, carefully maintained and made available to research scientists and educators, with exhibits and educational programs for the public. The museum is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thanks to an endowment started by a generous donation by Monte L. and Birdie Bean, the museum originally opened in March 1978, and admission is always free. mlbean.byu.edu 

The African Elephant is part of the West Center Atrium Area that will temporarily close from August to December.

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