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Intellect

Author of "A Return to Modesty" at BYU lecture Jan. 15

Wendy Shalit, author of "A Return to Modesty: Discovering the Lost Virtue," will discuss "Modesty: The Last Taboo" at a free lecture Wednesday (Jan. 15) at 6 p.m. in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium on the Brigham Young University campus.

The lecture will be followed by a question-and-answer session as well as a book signing in the JSB foyer hosted by the BYU Bookstore.

The public is welcome to attend all events.

In her ground-breaking book, Shalit argues that modesty and honor are virtues that all men and women should treasure, and explores the history of modesty and how it has been misunderstood.

"As long as we've been human, both men and women have needed to protect their sexual vulnerability," Shalit says. "The reason for modesty is not shame, but to safeguard the preciousness of intimacy and the dignity of humanity itself."

"Wendy Shalit advocates that the 'sexual liberation' movement has done far more to enslave women and men than liberate them," says BYU religion professor Brent L. Top. "She also advocates a return to traditional virtues, and believes that society would be better as a result."

"We're pleased to have her on campus because of our parallel beliefs on the importance of virtue," he said.

The address is sponsored by BYU Religious Education, Student Life, and the College of Fine Arts and Communications.

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