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Intellect

Annual Cutler lecture at BYU Nov. 3 to consider adolescence

Bruce A. Chadwick, professor of sociology at Brigham Young University, will present the 41st annual Virginia F. Cutler Lecture titled “Adolescence to Adulthood: Meandering Path or Straight Highway?” Thursday, Nov. 3, at 7 p.m. in 250 Spencer W. Kimball Tower.

The College of Family, Home and Social Sciences and the School of Family Life will host this annual lecture which is open to all those interested.

Chadwick joined BYU in 1977 as an associate professor of sociology. He had been director of the Urban Research Station in Seattle for Washington State University in Pullman.

He became chair of the BYU Sociology Department in 1978 and served in that position until 1984. He directed the BYU Family Studies Program beginning in 1986. Chadwick received a doctorate degree in sociology from Washington University in St. Louis.

Virginia Cutler, a BYU alumna and former faculty member, left an endowment to the university making the lecture series possible. The support of her descendents has continued to make the series a successful forum for discussion on family development topics.

For more information, please contact Bruce A. Chadwick at (801) 422-6026.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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