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Intellect

Animation at BYU subject of Lee Library lecture Nov. 3

R. Brent Adams, industrial design and animation professor at Brigham Young University, will discuss “What’s BYU Doing Making Cartoons?” at a Harold B. Lee Library’s House of Learning Lecture Thursday, Nov. 3, at 2 p.m. in the library auditorium on the first level.

Adams will speak on the history of animation at the university and the impact it has had on the world of filmmaking.

Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend.

Adams and his colleagues mentored students during the creation of “Lemmings” and “Petshop,” two animated short films that received the prestigious College Television Award, also known as the "Student Emmy."

The newly created animation major at BYU has produced some talented students who have turned their passion into a profession. Most of the team members who worked on “Lemmings” were offered jobs with animation and video game companies, and some of them have worked on recent films such as “Star Wars: Episode III,” “I-Robot” and the newest Tiger Woods Golf game.

The program has received three of 12 student Emmys awarded over the past two years for traditional animation and computer animation.

“We are the only school that won an Emmy in both categories, which says that our program is well balanced,” Adams said.

For more information about the BYU Library House of Learning Lectures, please contact Brian Champion at (801) 422-5862.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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