Skip to main content
Intellect

Ambassador from Belarus to give BYU lecture March 18

Event is a reschedule of a lecture to be given Feb. 11

The ambassador of Belarus to the United States and Mexico will speak at an Area Focus Lecture Thursday, March 18, at 11 a.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on the Brigham Young University campus.

Mikhail Khvostov will discuss "Belarus–U.S. Relations." The lecture, sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, is free and open to the public.

The event is a reschedule of a lecture Khvostov was to give Feb. 11.

Khvostov was appointed ambassador on March 21, 2003. He has also served as the Belarusian ambassador to Canada from 1997 to 2000.

Prior to his most recent assignment, Khvostov was deputy prime minister/minister of foreign affairs from 2000 to 2003 and assistant to the president of Belarus for foreign policy issues in 2000.

He has also served as deputy minister of foreign affairs and as first secretary both at the Belarus Embassy in Washington, D.C., and at the New York permanent mission of Belarus to the United Nations.

Khvostov is a member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration based in the Hague, Netherlands.

Contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 for more information, or visit the Kennedy Center Web site at kennedy.byu.edu/events for archived lectures and a calendar of other upcoming events and lectures.

Writer: Lee Simons

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
June 22, 2021
New BYU research recently published in the journal of Social Media + Society sheds light on the motives and personality characteristics of internet trolls.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 17, 2021
Engineering graduate student Jacob Sheffield has created a tiny origami-based device that serves as a miniature windshield wiper for laparoscope camera lenses.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 13, 2021
BYU geography professor Matt Bekker says record-breaking temperatures certainly contribute to Utah's water problem through evaporation, but the less-noticeable warming trend over months and years is the bigger problem. Most of the last 20 years have been drought years.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=