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Intellect

Air Force Young Investigator Research Program funds BYU professor's work

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research recently announced it will award grant money to Clark N. Taylor, a Brigham Young University assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering.

Taylor is one of 21 scientists and engineers selected to receive a portion of approximately $6.3 million from the Air Force’s new Young Investigator Research Program. Those selected of the 145 entries will receive part of the investment over a three-year period.

Taylor plans to use the grant to explore vision-assisted navigation of miniature unmanned aerial vehicles, one of his research specialties.

Recently named the David C. Evans Young Faculty Chair, Taylor received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical and computer engineering from BYU. In 2004, he earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego. He is the vice chair of the Utah chapter of the IEEE Computer Society and associate editor of the “IEEE on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology” publication.

For more information, contact Clark N. Taylor at (801) 422-3903.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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