Skip to main content
Intellect

36th Annual Summer Institute of Applied Statistics at BYU June 15-17

The 36th Annual Brigham Young University Summer Institute of Applied Statistics will be held Wednesday through Friday, June 15-17 on the BYU campus. G. Bruce Schaalje, professor of statistics at BYU, will present "The Art and Craft of Mixed Models." 

Register online at statistics.byu.edu. Academic registration is $450 before May 21 and $600 after. Non-academic rates are $700 before May 21 and $850 after. Registration closes June 6. For CES and student rates, contact Kathi Carter at (801) 422-4506.

After a brief discussion of the history and theory of mixed models, the seminar will cover the mixed model application: model specification, model selection, model checking and model usage.  Examples will be drawn from microbiology, exercise science, animal breeding, ecology and sociology. SAS software will also be highlighted, and Schaalje will suggest tools for specifying the structure of the experimental material and tools for graphically displaying features of the data. 

Schaalje has been a professor in the Department of Statistics at BYU since 1992. He worked as a statistician and research scientist for Agriculture Canada for 12 years prior to coming to BYU. He has authored or co-authored 130 publications in professional journals. His research interests include mixed models, ecological statistics, measurement error models and statistical authorship attribution. He received a master’s degree from the University of Washington and a doctorate from North Carolina State University. 

For more information, visit statistics.byu.edu or contact Kathi Carter at (801) 422-4506 or email kathi_carter@stat.byu.edu.

Writer: Mel Gardner

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Teaching kids about money pays off — in finances and relationships, BYU study shows

January 13, 2022
A new study from BYU discovered that children who learn proper money management behavior from their parents have more fulfilling relationships with their significant others in young adulthood.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU researchers sequenced the quinoa genome. Now they’re introducing hybrids of the crop to developing nations

January 11, 2022
As soils across the world become less fertile and more desert-like due to climate change, it’s getting harder for farmers, especially those in developing nations, to grow basic life-preserving crops such as corn, wheat and rice.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Top 10 BYU News Stories of 2021

December 29, 2021
The most-read BYU News stories of the year include research on internet trolling, advances in holography, the formation of the new Office of Belonging, and the many ways students and faculty have strengthened one another as they continue to persevere through a pandemic.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=