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BYU seeks to develop students of faith, intellect, and character. In addition to teaching classes, most BYU professors also conduct research in their academic field. Students – even at the undergraduate level – participate in research and publish their work alongside a faculty mentor. Here are the stories of what they discover together.

Erin Kaseda

Erin Kaseda, just a junior, recently presented her research at a prestigious professional neuroscience conference in Spain, as one of just three students invited. She was the only undergrad.

Andrew Mills and bike

Mechanical engineering students at BYU have created a special adapter to a bike pedal that allows people with leg-length discrepancies and knee flexibility issues ride smoothly and painlessly.

toppling Lego

A BYU researcher's targeted sound vibrations can topple individual Lego figurines without touch — and the applications extend far beyond play.

Clay Ellis

You’ve tried it all: spreadsheets, software, the envelope system. And despite your best efforts, it seems like every month you blow your budget. One BYU student wants you to give it one more shot, using his budgeting app.

Understanding more about KELT-16b, though it’s “as different from Earth as you could possibly get,” might ultimately give scientists a better understanding of our own planet.

Brigham Young University researchers have developed new glass technology that could add a new level of flexibility to the microscopic world of medical devices.

Underwater robot competition

More than 800 elementary and middle school students descended on the Lehi Legacy Center pool this week, but none of them got in the water.

Doris Kearns Goodwin, presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize–winning author, shared insight and stories about former U.S. Presidents and what we can learn from their examples at Tuesday's BYU Forum.

wilderness survival class

With so many elective classes at BYU, which ones are worth taking? Here six classes selected by students and the reasoning behind what made the classes their top pick.

When in Rome you do as the Romans do, right? Not necessarily. When it comes to fitting in with foreign cultures, “just be yourself” might be the more appropriate mantra, says new BYU research.